The Religious Blue Tint of Realism

In fantasy books by C. S. Lewis and Neil Gaiman I sense a style of realism that might occur as a result of their religious faith or backgrounds. Gaiman has stated in interviews that he loved to read Lewis as a child and that the Narnia chronicles inspired him as an author. Lewis was a christian and wrote a lot of books on christianity before he published the novels. Gaiman grew up in a jewish scientology family. Descriptions in the tradition of judean-christian world views tend to be offering a strong sense of realism, because their authors had the impression that they were writing nothing but the truth itself, and not mythology or fiction. Erich Auerbach has written about this. He had to draw the lines of a literary tradition because the nazis claimed that christianity was totally independent from judaism.

Blue tint: "In the tranquil fields and meadows of long-ago England, there is a small hamlet that has stood on a jut of granite for 600 years. Just to the east stands a high stone wall, for which the village is named. Here, in the hamlet of Wall, young Tristran Thorn has lost his heart to the hauntingly beautiful Victoria Forester. And here, one crisp October eve, Tristran makes his love a promise -- an impetuous vow that will send him through the only breach in the wall, across the pasture... and into the most exhilarating adventure of his life." Neil Gaiman, "Stardust"

Blue tint: “In the tranquil fields and meadows of long-ago England, there is a small hamlet that has stood on a jut of granite for 600 years. Just to the east stands a high stone wall, for which the village is named. Here, in the hamlet of Wall, young Tristran Thorn has lost his heart to the hauntingly beautiful Victoria Forester. And here, one crisp October eve, Tristran makes his love a promise — an impetuous vow that will send him through the only breach in the wall, across the pasture… and into the most exhilarating adventure of his life.” Neil Gaiman, “Stardust”

Green tint: "Night was falling now, and as I recalled what Akeley had written me about those earlier nights I shuddered to think there would be no moon. Nor did I like the way the farmhouse nestled in the lee of that colossal forested slope leading up to the Dark Mountain’s unvisited crest. With Akeley’s permission I lighted a small oil lamp, turned it low, and set it on a distant bookcase beside the ghostly bust of Milton; but afterward I was sorry I had done so, for it made my host’s strained, immobile face and listless hands look damnably abnormal and corpselike. He seemed half-incapable of motion, though I saw him nod stiffly once in a while." H. P. Lovecraft, "The Whisperer in Darkness"

Green tint: “Night was falling now, and as I recalled what Akeley had written me about those earlier nights I shuddered to think there would be no moon. Nor did I like the way the farmhouse nestled in the lee of that colossal forested slope leading up to the Dark Mountain’s unvisited crest. With Akeley’s permission I lighted a small oil lamp, turned it low, and set it on a distant bookcase beside the ghostly bust of Milton; but afterward I was sorry I had done so, for it made my host’s strained, immobile face and listless hands look damnably abnormal and corpselike. He seemed half-incapable of motion, though I saw him nod stiffly once in a while.” H. P. Lovecraft, “The Whisperer in Darkness”

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