The End of Power?

“‘How do you discuss anything with this many members? lol.’ A single Facebook comment thread, indeed, is possibly not the best place for a large-scale book group. Perhaps Zuckerberg can wield some more of his power to fix that.” (http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jan/08/mark-zuckerberg-the-end-of-power-facebook-book-club)

keanu zuckerberg

“”Thus it is hardly surprising that children should enthusiastically start their education at an early age with the Absolute Knowledge of computer science; while they are still unable to read, for reading demands making judgments at every line; and is the only access to the wealth of pre-spectacular human experience. Conversation is almost dead, and soon so too will be those who knew how to speak.” (Debord, 1988)

“From its inception, UNESCO had adopted a very precise scientific definition of the illiteracy which it strove to combat in backward countries. When the same phenomenon was unexpectedly seen to be returning, but this time in the so-called advanced nations, rather in the way that the one who was waiting for Grouchy instead saw Blucher join the battle, it was simply a matter of calling in the Guard of experts; they carried the day with a single, unstoppable assault, replacing the word illiteracy by ‘language difficulties’” (ibid)

“Baring argues that this essay is exemplary as a response to the conflicting demands of the exams, with their dual demands of patient, pedagogical exposition coupled with individuating personal brilliance, and that it anticipates in broad strokes some of the claims and structure of Speech and Phenomena. Baring then turns to the latter text, providing a careful outline of its argument and showing that it too follows the principles governing the agrégation. Derrida’s “broad sweep over the totality of Husserl’s philosophy allowed him to provide a relatively standard and clear account of phenomenology . . . thus fulfill[ing] the pedagogical section of the agrégation” (250). This provides the basis from which emerges Derrida’s interpretative intervention (his “personal brilliance”), showing the ways Husserl’s system undermines its own claims.” (http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/32600-the-young-derrida-and-french-philosophy/)

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