Louder Than Bombs (Movie/Soundtrack/Album)

Sing me to sleep
Sing me to sleep
I’m tired and I
I want to go to bed

Sing me to sleep
Sing me to sleep
And then leave me alone
Don’t try to wake me in the morning
‘Cause I will be gone
Don’t feel bad for me
I want you to know
Deep in the cell of my heart
I will feel so glad to go

Sing me to sleep
Sing me to sleep
I don’t want to wake up
On my own anymore

Sing to me
Sing to me
I don’t want to wake up
On my own anymore

Don’t feel bad for me
I want you to know
Deep in the cell of my heart
I really want to go

There is another world
There is a better world
Well, there must be
Well, there must be
Well, there must be
Well, there must be
Well…

Bye bye
Bye bye
Bye…

Shakespeare And NASA: Contexts For Some of David Markson’s Fragments

“No more behind

But such a day tomorrow as today

And to be boy eternal.

The second Brandenburg concerto, on an indestructible phonograph disc, is drifting eternally in space affixed to Voyager II” –David Markson, from his novel Reader’s BlockSkjermbilde 2016-05-16 kl. 12.32.30.pngSkjermbilde 2016-05-16 kl. 12.32.40.pngScreen dumps from the book Starting With Derrida by Sean Gaston

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Screen dumps from the book This is Not a Tragedy: The Works of David Markson By Françoise Palleau-Papin

A Note In Deconstructing Dawkins on Skavlan

Transcript from the talk show Skavlan December 4th 2015:

Linn Ullmann (norwegian author): «Do you believe in grace? Something as in music or…»

Richard Dawkins: «What do you mean by “grace”?»

Ullmann: «I’d like to know what you mean by it.»

Dawkins: «I don’t, I don’t use the word.»

Ullmann: «Is that a word that is not even in your vocabulary?»

Dawkins: «No, it isn’t, but I don’t want you to get away with saying that Bach sort of belong to the supernatural, because Bach wrote beautiful music, inspired by religion, which I apresiate as much as anybody else, I mean I adore Bach, I don’t want anybody to get away with the sort of thought that an atheist can not apreciate the great art, the great music, the great poetry of the world. Far from it! We can, we do.»

(Applause in audience)

End of transcript.

I have marked in bold the part of the transcript where Dawkins instead of continuing on Ullmanns derivation of the word «grace» in music Dawkins plays on with the phonic signifier of music itself, claiming that atheists can enjoy the art of the phonic signifiers. He get touched by music, by a signifier that comes silently from the sheet music through the ear and into the soul, or in Dawkin’s terminology: the gene for enjoying music. I think it’s interesting how language fall short in describing the experience of the thing that with the linguistic signs is called «grace», and how it kind of flows into music.

Convolute F: Derrida, Glossolalia, Claire Duncan

Glossolalia, often understood among Protestant Christians as speaking in tongues, is the fluid vocalizing of speech-like syllables that lack any readily comprehended meaning, in some cases as part of religious practice.[1] Some consider it as a part of a sacred language. It is a common practice amongst Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity. (wikipedia) Lyrically both bands work in a way that I admire – Cocteau Twins for the nonsense glossolalia and The Cure for their precise yet loaded imagery. The first book that fed into what I wanted to make was Six Memos for the Next Millenium by Italo Calvino. He discusses five qualities that he values in literature (he died before he wrote the sixth) — these being abstract, vague concepts such as ‘Lightness’, ‘Exactitude’, ‘Multiplicity’ and so on. hat strikes me most is how he contemplates these very mysterious, unfathomable ideas that have little or no way of being measured in a fashion that is succinct and precise, condensed and careful. This dichotomy is possible to explore through music I feel because music is comprised of a series of continums: space, pitch, tone, dynamic, and so on. Read more: http://www.undertheradar.co.nz/interview/516/Dear-Times-Waste.utr#ixzz3cJ46qptD

Screen shot from Marjorie Perloff's book Wittgenstein's Ladder

Screen shot from Marjorie Perloff’s book Wittgenstein’s Ladder